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Winter is here

Posted by admin on June 4, 2012

The air is chilly at night now, and I have heard the first of the Sarus cranes fly over, making their beautiful calls as they pass over my studio.

The Sarus Crane is a very close relative to the Brolga, and they look very similar but for the extra red a Sarus Crane has on its head and part way down its neck. It makes a distinctive call as it flies, often in formation. The strange thing with a Sarus crane is though, they migrate to a colder area in winter time! They head up north to the Gulf of Carpentaria in our hot humid summer to breed, and come back to the Atherton Tablelands between May and December, where it can get as low as 5 degrees C.at night with the occasional frost! I do enjoy seeing them fly overhead as they go about their daily business.

I am now working towards my next group exhibition with the Yungaburra Village Artists later this month. I fired big bertha last week, and I am pleased to say that my little orphaned paddy melon has come out without even a crack! I did over fire the kiln a lttle though and the glaze on my Flindersia pods is a little overfired. I want to put my bone china luminescent fungi in this exhibition as well, but I will need to make a large diorama- like box to sit them in so people can see them glow. I have been busy making moulds for a new functional ware line that I hope to decorate with local botanical themes. I have to test glazes for suitability and try out my new line drawings of a yellow penda, firewheel tree, powderpuff lillypilly, fungi, and other local rainforest flowers.

I do wonder if I have too many different projects on the go, and are not focusing on one project to improve upon. I suppose that is the dilemma of a ceramic artist - to have some form of cash flow, we need to have what we call a 'bread and butter' line - products that are cheaper than our artwork, and are usually functional. However, working on our 'bread and butter' lines often takes up a lot of our time, and it becomes more difficult to justify time spent on our artwork, as our art does not bring in a regular income. I do feel fortunate doing what I love to do - many people would love to have this dilemma! 


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